THE results from our final poll have revealed who is the top childcare educator in the North Burnett region.
THE results from our final poll have revealed who is the top childcare educator in the North Burnett region.

WINNER: North Burnett’s best childcare educator revealed

AFTER residents from across the North Burnett cast their votes in the finalist poll for top childcare educators in the region, Deb Crawford from Mundubbera Family Daycare has been declared as the winner.

Only beginning her journey into childcare six months ago, Ms Crawford said she was “overwhelmed” and “humbled” that she was even nominated.

“I only started doing this on July 13, 2020,” Ms Crawford said.

Deb Crawford, the winner of our best childcare educator poll, voted by the people of the North Burnett. Photo: Kristen Camp
Deb Crawford, the winner of our best childcare educator poll, voted by the people of the North Burnett. Photo: Kristen Camp

While Ms Crawford’s daycare comes under Mundubbera Family Daycare, her business is run from a house she rents in Gayndah.

This way, Ms Crawford is able to keep the house completely COVID Safe and keep it fully equipped for the job.

Ms Crawford drumming to music with the children. Photo: Kristen Camp
Ms Crawford drumming to music with the children. Photo: Kristen Camp

Ms Crawford believes the children’s parents voted for her, as well as her family and friends.

“I am thankful firstly for the nominations and a little shocked to have been voted this title,” she said.

“A huge thank you to each and every one of you.”

Caring for a total of 10 children, aged between 14 months and three years old, Ms Crawford said she loves making a difference in their lives.

The Christmas craft this morning was a Santa mask made using cotton wool, paper plates and paper. Photo: Kristen Camp
The Christmas craft this morning was a Santa mask made using cotton wool, paper plates and paper. Photo: Kristen Camp

“I enjoy watching the children develop and grow alongside me while teaching them new and different things,” she said.

“A child’s heart would be the most purest of hearts because if they love something, they love it unconditionally.”

Coming from an aged-care background, Ms Crawford said the transition was quite different.

“It was like going from making a difference in the end of life and now I have reversed the role and am now making a difference at the beginning of life,” she said.

Hands on play with trucks in the sandpit. Photo: Kristen Camp
Hands on play with trucks in the sandpit. Photo: Kristen Camp

Ms Crawford chose to do family daycare because of her aunt, who ran her own daycare from home.

Her aunt’s philosophy was to fill her home with love and security, ensuring the children felt at home.

“I wanted that for the children I care for, I feel it's more comforting for children to be in a family place such as a home environment and have the one carer everyday,” Ms Crawford said.

“In a centre, staffing always changes and it’s not a settling feeling for a child not knowing who is caring for them each day.”

Arlo, Keeley and Miley. Photo: Kristen Camp
Arlo, Keeley and Miley. Photo: Kristen Camp

Ms Crawford also believes it puts the parents’ minds at ease to know the person caring for their child.

“[They] see the connection the children have with each other and their carer,” she said.

“I love that it’s family-based as my own children also can be at work with me and the other children.”

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