BIG STUDENT: Assistant ag coordinator Wally Ford with the Mundubbera State School's cow named Bernie.
BIG STUDENT: Assistant ag coordinator Wally Ford with the Mundubbera State School's cow named Bernie. Philippe Coquerand

Farming program is thriving

AGRICULTURE plays a vital role in our society and at Mundubbera State School the students are educated in a wide range of activities.

From breaking in cows to growing vegetable gardens and most recently learning about aquaponics, students are becoming more engaged.

Head of department and agriculture co-ordinator at Mundubbera State School Nicole Evans said the program had run since 2006 and had proven extremely beneficial to students.

Mrs Evans said the program could not have been successful without support from the community and in particular the annual Hoof 'n' Hook competition.

"The ag program that we build up today is only possible through our community partnerships we have,” Mrs Evans said.

"Our animals are donated by either community groups like Rotary or community producers and the funds that we get back from that competition, is how we've managed to develop that program.”

Mrs Evans said the program equipped students with real life practical skills.

"(It's) hands-on experiences that they can utilise if they're going into the agricultural industry in the future,” she said.

Assistant coordinator for the ag programs, Wally Ford, said the students were enjoying themselves and getting immersed with hands on activities.

"The kids love it,” he said.

"We're in an agriculture environment and we need to teach the students a little about what's on the land.

"Some of the students don't even know where the milk comes from, so this program is giving them an idea of what's out there.”